Discovering Hills with the Dutch

I have just spent a few days hanging out with more ‘extended cousins’, this time from my Mum’s side of the family. Marthein (my mum’s cousin) and his wife Gerda drove from Gouda to Sheffield on Thursday and I met them at my brother’s bakery just in time for lunch. That afternoon we visited Kelham Island, a museum about industry and steel production in Sheffield. My favourite room was the Hawley Collection – full of saws, knives, screw drivers and surgical instruments, it was tool heaven.

The sunshine came out on Friday as the three of us headed into the Peak District. We didn’t have a plan of where to go and what to see so it was a day of spontaneous exploration and adventure. First stop was Derwent Reservoir, a popular spot for walkers and bike riders.

Whoever designed this dam wall wished he was building a castle.

Whoever designed this dam wall wished he was building a castle.

It almost reminded me of Mundaring Weir except with more water.

It almost reminded me of Mundaring Weir except with more water.

Neither The Netherlands nor Australia is known for  mountainous terrain so we were all very impressed by the lumpy landscape of the Peaks. We took the opportunity to climb these natural wonders and enjoy the views from raised ground. Our first climb was Mam Tor, a 517m hill with remarkable views across the countryside. While the sun was shining, it was a windy day and it became increasingly more breezy the higher we got. At the top of the hill you had to hold on with your toes to stop yourself from flying off the side. I did contemplate base jumping but decided my mum wouldn’t approve.

Gerda making her way up the hill.

Gerda making her way up the hill.

View from the top of Mam Tor.

View from the top of Mam Tor.

After we had descended and climbed back into the safety and warmth of the car, we headed to the nearby market village of Castleton in search of a castle. And a castle we did find – again on top of a hill. Peveril Castle was first built in 1080 and now all that remains are some ruins. There is, however, a tower that you can climb and you get a wonderful view back towards Mam Tor.

Castle ruins, green grass and nice views.

Castle ruins, lazing grass and nice views.

View from the castle.

View from the castle.

It's Mam Tor!

It’s Mam Tor!

After all of this climbing we needed a cup of tea so dropped into a pub advertising tea and scones. We didn’t, however, notice the other sign that announced no food was being served between 3–5pm, and so our 4.25pm arrival meant that no scones could be served. This was also following our less than wonderful lunch at a pub in the historic precinct of Chapel-en-le-Frith. All of the menu items arrived in a truck and were then heated and plated by a man in a chef’s uniform. It wasn’t a top food day but the views were great.

"Lunch."

“Lunch.”

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4 Responses to “Discovering Hills with the Dutch”

  1. Katy says:

    Erm… what’s that yellow slimy stuff in the “sandwich”?

  2. Jess says:

    I believe they called it “cheese”.

  3. Annick says:

    Wow Jess, hope you want to make such a trip one more with us, it looks amazing!!

  4. Jess says:

    Of course, Annick!! Come and visit! :)

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